Landscape Technologies and Techniques

This course combines the two primary technologies employed by landscape architects to shape space and function in the landscape: landform and planting design. The three-dimensional literacy and observation skills required to articulate these elements are introduced through various landscape representation techniques. The relationship between planting, topography, and human intervention and behavior in the landscape was explored during a field trip to Yuen Long Town Park. Other field trips included a Soil Workshop with David St Maur Sheil where students were introduced to the fundamental importance of soils in landscape. During a visit to ArkEden on Lantau students watered and applied fertilizer to tree seedlings planted on eroded slopes, sketched the landscape from life, experienced the reality of topography and how it corresponds with contour maps, and observed children’s nature-based education in action. At the end of the course, students reflected on their experience of the course and demonstrated that they had gained invaluable skills and insights into the basics of the technologies and techniques required for landscape design.

Landscape Technologies and Techniques

This course combined the two primary technologies employed by landscape architects to shape space and function in the landscape: landform and planting design. The three-dimensional literacy required to articulate these elements was introduced through various landscape representation techniques. The relationship between planting, topography, and human intervention and behavior in the landscape was explored through a ‘virtual’ field trip to Yuen Long Town Park using videos posted on Facebook workplace. Students further investigated this theme by means of their own case studies presented by video. Plants were introduced as members of plant communities and components of particular ecologies through further field trips. Students then explored the relationship between plants and human impacts on the landscape in a written assignment couched in the form of an imaginary letter from a particular tree or group of plants to us human beings. Students further demonstrated the design impact of planting in an urban setting, presenting an existing street scene without greening, then visualizing the same view after the addition of street trees. Demonstration videos explaining how to construct the drawings, including basic perspective drawings, were made available online for reference. At the end of the course, students reflected on their experience of the course and demonstrated that they had gained invaluable skills and insights into the basics of the technologies and techniques required for landscape design.

Landscape Technologies and Techniques

This course combines the two primary means of shaping space and function in the landscape: landform and planting design. Landform: Essential techniques for shaping the land were explored, with a particular focus on incorporating grading strategies into the site design process. Students explored a variety of techniques and applications for designing and documenting the grading process. Planting Design: The course considered key principles of designing with plants in the landscape. Plants were introduced as members of plant communities and components of particular ecologies. Field trips including hands on activities such as tree climbing and surveying topography with a dumpy level at the HKU Kadoorie Centre, and mulching recently planted saplings of a hillside afforestation programme at Ark Eden on Lantau form an integral part of this course. The course also included some landscape representation techniques including life and plant drawing, contour plans and sections, and visualizations of the impact of tree planting in urban street environments.

Landscape, Biophysics

In this studio we explored the physical and biological elements and systems that make up our world, and the forces that shape them. In particular, we sought to understand how they interact and how they change over time. While examining them, we worked out best ways to describe and represent them, graphically. This gave a basis for manipulating them (by design), and understanding the likely consequences of any changes. To do this we investigated two environments: one mostly natural (Pokfulam Valley) and one largely man-made (Queens Road, HK). We studied the nature of the elements and processes within each, and the commonalities and differences between them. In each place students proposed an intervention. In the natural environment they looked to modify it to allow for human occupation, in the man-made environment they look to re-introduce natural elements and make occupation by humans easier. Through these interventions they were able to understand the fundamental relationship between nature and man. Some of the models and design from the final assignment were exhibited as part of the ‘Liveability of Design’ Exhibition held at HKSAR Central Government Offices in September 2017.