Landscape Intensive

The PDLA Landscape Architecture Intensive is a three-week summer course developed to introduce students to concepts of landscape architecture within the context of Hong Kong. Daily sessions included lectures and workshops built upon basic drawing and representation techniques along with seminars introducing concepts related to scale, climate, materials and landscape design elements. Discovery walks provided an outline to Hong Kong’s typical spaces and framed understanding of physical, social and economic issues influencing the urban development as well as introduction to key information related to planting, technology and history. During the three weeks students were guided through an intensive design exploration that introduced them to representation technics, landscape architecture concepts and elements found within the small urban spaces of Hong Kong. For the first two weeks, students explored standard and non-standard units of measurement to survey and map a tree taken from the Register of Old and Valuable Trees list. They created a set of accurate measured documents of the tree using both plan and section/ elevation and a series of illustrative diagrams that reveal information concerning the specific characteristics of the species, habitat and natural form. Using multimedia collage, they then explored the environmental context of the tree as it related to time, place and landscape systems. During the third week of the course, students explored fundamental conventions of landscape design through a series of incremental exercises that included essential skills of photographic mapping, collage, interpretation of image into drawing, and then drawing into model.

Post-Industrial Waterfront: Research of Sustainable Planning Strategies at Industrial Legacy Site

Students were given the ‘wicked problem’ of identifying and trying to resolve the complex and conflicting issues of urban renewal at wide planning horizons in scale and time. The urban industrial waterfront site at Gin Drinkers Bay offered multiple difficulties associated with access, connectivity, identity, contamination and inefficient land use. In assessing the area from differing micro and macro perspectives, students were led though systematic techniques to help enable them to evaluate and filter out relevant and targeted project programming inputs through the generation of overarching project goals, sustainability objectives and detailed and localised implementation strategies. Explorations included projecting complex urban scenarios forward with vision and flexibility, ranging from infrastructure and urban morphology to social and natural systems, the norms for which are anticipated to change dramatically through the future periods of implementation. Such approaches were developed for critical decision making at an urban scale, specifically highlighting the necessity for understanding policy, funding and recurrent cost implications over the short, medium and long terms as well as the resultant implications for landscape design. Deliverables were presented through a variety of media including class presentations using time control techniques, individual and collaborative video documentary, and final submission of a Project Study Report accompanied by a promotional video. See more on https://arch4701fall2020.hku.hk/.

Landscape Intensive

The newly introduced two-week intensive course was developed to give freshly arriving students an orientation to both the department facilities and the learning processes, as well as providing a general understanding of the urban landscapes of Hong Kong. Daily sessions included lectures and workshops built upon basic drawing and visual communication techniques, along with seminars introducing concepts of the curriculum focused on mapping and scale; landscape elements and terminology; climate and microclimate; and materials and textures. Discovery walks provided an outline to many of Hong Kong’s typical spaces and framed understanding of physical, social, and economic issues influencing the urban development form, along with facilitating an introduction to key information related to planting, technology, history, and theory. Students were then guided through a continuous ‘design studio’ to explore the introduced concepts and landscape elements found within the small urban spaces of Hong Kong while adopting immersive presentation techniques that demonstrated understanding and facilitated further discussion on ‘landscape’ from their own particular perspectives. Throughout the course, students familiarized themselves with the broad scope of the study area and basic terminology used in the field of landscape design while beginning to understand how to identify, measure, record, and analyze landscape elements and spaces.

Post Industrial Riverfront: Research of Sustainable Planning Strategies at Industrial Legacy Site

Students were given the ‘wicked problem’ of identifying and trying to resolve the complex and conflicting issues of urban renewal at wide planning horizons in terms of both scale and time. The urban industrial waterfront site at Gin Drinkers Bay offered multiple difficulties associated with access, connectivity, identity, contamination, and inefficient land use. In assessing the area from differing micro and macro perspectives, students were led through systematic techniques to help enable them to evaluate and filter out relevant and targeted project programming inputs through the generation of overarching project goals, sustainability objectives, and detailed and localized implementation strategies. Explorations included projecting complex urban scenarios forward with vision and flexibility, ranging from infrastructure and urban morphology to social and natural systems, the norms for which are anticipated to change dramatically through the future periods of implementation. Such approaches were developed for critical decision making at an urban scale, specifically highlighting the necessity for understanding policy and funding, and recurrent cost implications over the short, medium, and long terms, as well as the resultant implications for landscape design. Deliverables were presented through a variety of media, including class presentations using time control techniques, an individual and collaborative video documentary, and final submission of a Project Study Report accompanied by a promotional video.