Application of Hong Kong Construction Waste Management Experience in Mainland China: An Empirical Exploration

Department: Real Estate and Construction
Research Centre: iLab
Active Dates: January 2013 - December 2016

Principal Investigator: Wilson W.S. LU
Funding body: NSFC

Abstract

There is a huge demand for construction, which in turn generates a huge amount of construction waste. Various technical, economical, and managerial measures, which are largely based on the waste hierarchy including reduction, reuse, and recycle (3R), have been implemented in Hong Kong to deal with the construction waste. It is considered that the CWM experience provides valuable references to developing effective CWM practices in Mainland China. The aim is to identify effective policy, technical and economical CWM measures in Mainland China. It is envisaged that these measures, and waste generation, against the broader Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental, and Legal (PESTEL) contexts, will form a complicatedly dynamic system. Based on the systems thinking, an artificial neural network (ANN) model is to be developed to mimic the system and embrace its complexity. A large set of longitudinal panel data of the factors will be gleaned from various sources to “train” the model. Academically, it links the various theories on CWM with the pressing CWM issues in China. It is anticipated that China’s characteristics such as large scale, massive volume, will lead to an improved understanding of how these CWM theories can be supported or refuted in a unique context. Practically, the project can assist various local authorities to develop more effective CWM measures in China.

Objectives

  1. To identify effective policy, technical and economical CWM measures in Mainland China.
  2. To link the various theories on CWM (e.g. stakeholder theory, “polluter pays principle”, 3R CWM hierarchy) with the pressing CWM issues in China.
  3. To improve the understanding of how these CWM theories can be supported or refuted in a unique context.
  4. To assist various local authorities to develop more effective CWM measures in China.

Results

  1. The project identified waste reduction potential in prefabrication and on-site sorting, off-site sorting, and suggested policies and strategies for improving CWM based on the inert and non-inert dichotomy of construction waste;
  2. The project linked various theories including stakeholder, polluter pays principle, and Coarse Theorem to improve CWM, and enhanced the understanding of how these theories can be supported and refuted in the context of Hong Kong and Mainland China;
  3. The project team transferred knowledge in CWM across countries, including China, Italy, and Spain.

Outputs

Selected peer-reviewed journal papers

  • Lu, W.S., Webster, C., Peng Y., Chen, X., and Zhang, X.L. (2016). Estimating and calibrating the amount of building-related construction and demolition waste in urban China. International Journal of Construction Management, Forthcoming.
  • Lu, W.S., Chen, X., Ho, D.C., and Wang, H.D. (2016). Analysis of the construction waste management performance in Hong Kong: the public and private sectors compared using big data. Journal of Cleaner Production, 112, 521-531.
  • Lu, W.S., Peng, Y., Webster, C., and Zuo, J. (2015). Stakeholders’ willingness to pay for enhanced construction waste management: A Hong Kong study. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 47, 233-240.
  • Lu, W.S. and Tam, V.W.Y. (2013). Construction waste management policies and their effectiveness in Hong Kong: A longitudinal review. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 23, 214-223.
Photo 1: Dr. Wilson Lu attended the Sixth Regional 3R Forum in Asia and the PacificFigure 1: Benchmark Analysis of Construction Waste in Hong KongFigure 1-2: Benchmark Analysis of Construction Waste in Hong KongFigure 2: Big data of Hong Kong Construction WasteFigure 3: The interview of Dr Wilson Lu on Construction Waste Management in China was published in The New YorkDr. Wilson Lu was interviewed by The Economist on 16th April 2014
UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE