A Dose of Nature 01

A Dose of Nature: Tree Cover Density and Human Health

Project Title: A Dose of Nature: Tree Cover Density and Human Health

Team:
Bin Jiang (Co-PI, project manager), Chun-Yen Chang (Co-PI, National University of Taiwan), William C. Sullivan (PI, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Project Funder:
The study was partially supported with two grants from the USDA Forest Service: One recommended by the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (Agreement #11-DG-11132544-333); the other from the US Forest Service Northern Research Station. We appreciate members of the Sustainability and Human Health Lab at Illinois for their participation in this research.

Abstract:
The demands and pressures of modern life are precursors to two of the most deadly medical problems we face today, cardiac disease and stroke. Long-term responses to stressful events put individuals at higher risk for these serious conditions. Fortunately, there is mounting evidence that exposure to urban forests enhances the resources that allow people to more effectively manage their stresses.

In these studies, we found that people not only prefer urban forests with greater tree cover density, but more importantly that they recover faster from stressful events as tree cover density increases. When it comes to urban forests and recovery from stress, every tree matters.

These findings, however, differed by gender. For women, there was a strong effect of tree density on psychological stress. For men the impact was seen in psychological, physiological, and hormonal measures of stress.

These findings are consistent with pervious work showing that people living in close contact with urban forests are more likely to live longer, pay attention better, have stronger ties to their neighbors, and experience a host of other positive benefits.

The bottom line: we should plant trees at every doorstep.

Outputs:

Jiang, B., Larsen, L., Deal, B., & Sullivan, W. C. (2015). A dose–response curve describing the relationship between tree cover density and landscape preference. Landscape and Urban Planning, 139(0), 16-25. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2015.02.018

Jiang, B., Chang, C.Y., & Sullivan, W. C. (2014). A dose of nature: Tree cover, stress reduction, and gender differences. Landscape and Urban Planning, 132(0), 26-36. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.08.005

Jiang, B., Li, D., Larsen, L.,Sullivan, W. C.  (2014). A Dose-Response Curve Describing the Relationship Between Urban Tree Cover Density and Self-Reported Stress Recovery. Environment and Behavior. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0013916514552321

Establishing dose-response curves for the impact of urban forests on recovery from acute stress and landscape preference. By Jiang, Bin, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, 2013, 195 pages; 3632060. http://gradworks.umi.com/36/32/3632060.html

Quotation:

Media reports on this project

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-10-d-videos-trees-people-recover.html

http://www.worldhealth.net/news/trees-tranquility/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2802380/is-street-view-secret-relaxing-researchers-watched-3d-video-tree-lined-streets-significantly-improved-state-mind.html

http://www.dailyillini.com/article/2015/04/exposure-to-greenery-could-reduce-stress-levels?mode=jqm

http://news.illinois.edu/news/14/1021nature_WilliamSullivan_BinJiang.html

http://dirt.asla.org/2014/06/04/nature-is-but-another-name-for-health/

http://matome.naver.jp/odai/2138615736343480701

 

Impact of exposure to green spaces and laptop use on students’ cognitive functioning

Title: Impact of exposure to green spaces and laptop use on students’ cognitive functioning

Team: Bin Jiang (PI, Corresponding Author), Rose Schmillen (Co-PI, U of IL), William C. Sullivan (Co-PI, U of IL)

Project Funder: USA Forest Service, Faculty of Architecture seed fund HKU

Abstract: Although many studies have been conducted that demonstrate the restorative affects of green spaces, the conditions of these experiments are controlled in such a way that the participants have no distractions to direct their attention elsewhere. When taking a break from studying or working, many college students do not just sit quietly in a space. Technology is an easy medium to turn to when taking a break, and students may use it to surf the internet, watch TV, or play games. If a student is using technology in a restorative space, does it influence the restorative effects of nature? The goal of this study is to find out if the restorative benefits of being in a green space are in any way compromised by the use of technology, specifically a laptop. If laptop use predicts lower rates of recovery from stress and recovery of the ability to pay attention, then it may influence people to spend more time in nature without technology. However, if people can still recover in a green space more than in a barren space even while using their laptops, it may inspire people to use their computers to take a break in a more restorative space. This study may also give us a glimpse into how technology affects our perception of the world around us.

Based off of what we know about attention restoration, one would suppose that the condition of a restorative green space without the use of technology would be most restorative. The barren space with the use of technology is likely to be least restorative because the environment does not support restoration and the use of technology could itself be mentally fatiguing. The two remaining factors are harder to guess. Is it more beneficial in terms of attention restoration to be in a restorative space with the use of technology or to be in a barren space that is free of technology?

The outcome could also be dependent on what kind of technology is used. If the activity on the laptop requires more directed attention, it would have a greater mentally fatiguing effect, or would make recovery in a restorative space lower. By asking the students to record what kind of activities they engage in on their laptops, we can also analyze the data according to types of applications used.

Through this study, we are learning how to better make recommendations for attention restoration. Is a green space just as restorative with the distraction of technology, or is it less restorative? By conducting this study, we are learning more about the mechanisms behind attention restoration. Is it required that people pay attention to the restorative space, or can restoration work through distraction or other avenues of hard fascination? This study also begins to prompt questions about what kind of activities done in restorative spaces affect attention restoration.

 

Satellite imagery vs. eye-level photography: Evaluating associations among measurements of tree cover density at the site scale

Title: Satellite imagery vs. eye-level photography: Evaluating associations among measurements of tree cover density at the site scale

Team: Bin Jiang, William C. Sullivan (Co-PI, U of Illinois)

Project Funder: USA Forest Service

Abstract: This study is an initial effort to understand the relationships among multiple measures of tree cover density and to identify their various advantages and constraints. At the site scale, top-down measures calculated using satellite image are not associated with eye-level measures of tree cover density when tree canopy cover is at a medium or high level. The findings presented here challenge the wide-spread use of top-down tree cover density as the dominant tool for guiding the design and management of urban forests. One promising way to overcome the challenges identified in this study would be to integrate measures of tree density from satellite imagery and eye-level photography and develop a comprehensive index of greenness that can more sensitively depict the urban tree canopy that people experience on site. Our findings warn urban forest professionals that heavy reliance on digital aerial photographs and maps may lead to landscape assessments and decisions that do not represent individuals’ eye-level experience of a site. Using eye-level photographs and visiting a site in person are still irreplaceable tools.

 

A critic of campus town planning methods in China: Environmental design to address crime and violence problems in GuangZhou campus town

Title: A critic of campus town planning methods in China: Environmental design to address crime and violence problems in GuangZhou campus town

Team: Bin Jiang, He Zhan (Co-PI, MLA student), Matthew Pryor (Co-PI), Chris Webster (Co-PI)

Project Funder: Faculty of Architecture seed fund

Abstract:

Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (HEMC), Guangzhou University Town is an area featured by higher education institutions, located on Xiaoguwei Island in Guangzhou, China. It was opened in 2004. With an area of approximately 17.9 km2 and 3.53 million square meters of indoor space, the complex is capable of accommodating 350 to 400 thousand people.

However, lots of bad news about safety issues has been reported in the recent years. On June 29, 2015, two dead bodies were found at the campus. This scary news reminds us of an important issue—safe campus landscape.

In this research, the CPTED concept is utilized as an important design reference. CPTED short for crime prevention through environmental design, refers to a way, by which people can eliminate the impacts of the space environment on criminal acts, strengthen punishment and psychological factors, enhance the difficulty for implementing criminal acts, reduce the opportunities of successful criminal acts, and further succeed in preventing crime.

At present, the author has collected 565 valid questionnaires whose feedback indicates that the campus is actually quite dangerous. Specifically, 51 people (10%) have met crime cases at the university town before, and 65% victims are female. Numerous data show the urban design and landscape are important factors triggering the occurrence of crime.

The ultimate goal of this research is to provide a new design solution or strategy for the university town in Guangzhou. The results indicate that it is a good way to review the development of university towns in China. Besides, the successful experience can be beneficial for the campus planning in the future.

 

Creating Restorative Environment for Highly Stressed and Depressed Workers: Using Foxconn Factory In Shenzhen As The Site

Title: Creating Restorative Environment for Highly Stressed and Depressed Workers: Using Foxconn Factory In Shenzhen As The Site

Team: Bin Jiang, Fengyu Bao (Co-PI, MLA student)

Project Funder: Faculty of Architecture seed fund

Abstract:

Between January, 2010 and April, 2013, 19 suicides attempts happened at the industrial parks of Foxconn. Foxconn is the world’s largest contract electronics manufacturer at the time. In terms of the ages, the victims were among the age of 17-25, an age of youth. Recent researches and studies found that the one of the reasons behind the spate jumps of Foxconn is long-term exposure to high stress working and living environment.

The positive relationship between stress relief and green landscape has been proved by lots of scientific studies, there is still very few industrial park designs concerning about this issue. The current outdoor environment in Foxconn industrial park can be described as monotonous, lifeless and unified. A new industrial design method needs to be implemented to mitigate the problem.

In this study, workers’ opinions will be engaged in the process of Guanlan Foxconn industrial park design and participatory photo mapping (PPM)will be conducted as a tool for collecting first-hand information of Guanlan Foxconn park and workers’ opinions. In the first step, the workers will be hired to take photos of places where they like and dislike and then a standardized landscape assessment questionnaire will be used to assess the photos they take. Meanwhile, interview will be conducted to collect more information about workers’ stress status, living experience, and environment assessment. In the second step, based on worker’s opinion, we will make photo simulations based on the site photos they take to show how the place would be like according to workers’ preferences in the first step. In the third step, the photo simulations will be assessed again by the workers through the same standardized questionnaire. Thus a final design will be carried out.

A quotation: “ Jiang’s research project will be fundamentally important for improving workers’ mental health and well-being”- Prof. Huilin Lu, Peking University, leading social scientist on Foxccon suicide and working condition problems.

Urban Soundscapes: The Effects of Auditory and Visual Stimulations on Moods

Title:Urban Soundscapes: The Effects of Auditory and Visual Stimulations on Moods

Team: Bin Jiang, Wenqi Ji (Co-PI, U of Illinois), Matthew Pryor (Co-PI)

Project Funder: Faculty of Architecture seed fund

Abstract: Negative moods can lead to a variety of negative health outcomes. Although we know how a variety of visual elements in a landscape can impact people’s moods, we know a great deal less about how sounds in the landscape influence mood. What is the relationship between visual environments and soundscapes, and how do they interact to affect mood in urban cityscapes? To what extent do some typical landscape sounds, such as birds chirping or traffic noise, increase positive or negative feelings?

This research examines the extent to which different sounds in urban landscapes affect people’s self-reported mood and explores the relationships between visual elements and sounds on people’s moods. We conducted an across-culture, lab-based experimental study in which participants were randomly assigned to watch one of nine videos of three types of urban places (city park, urban street, and office plaza) paired with three types of acoustic environments (nature sound, traffic noise, or no sound). The visual environments of urban places were collected through a video-camera in Chicago city and the sound materials were collected from online sound libraries. We conducted 66 tests in Illinois, USA and 67 tests in Hong Kong SAR, China. Each participant filled out the Multi-dimensional Mood Questionnaire before and after watching and listening to the videos. We measured the impact the visual and sound environments had on changes in participant’s moods.

The findings show some common results across USA and HK: soundscapes impact mood more than the visual elements of the urban spaces in consistent and measurable ways. Soundscapes depicting nature evoked pleasant moods for people while traffic sounds evoked unpleasant moods, even when the traffic sounds were paired with calming, natural urban landscapes. We also found some differences between USA and HK tests. Hong Kong participants showed significantly greater appreciation to no sound video than Americans and a low sensitivity to difference of visual environments.

This study produces new knowledge on the effects of different soundscapes on people’s mood and has implications for teaching and practice. It is also important to consider difference of cultural background, lifestyle, and place attachment. Most importantly, it suggests that researchers and landscape designers should not ignore sounds and their relationship to visual elements when designing landscapes that promote human health and well-being.

Quotation: Invited presentation on Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture 2016 Annual Conference, Utah, USA

Revitalizing alleys in high-density cities: How urban and landscape design interventions impact the sense of safety

Title: Revitalizing alleys in high-density cities: How urban and landscape design interventions impact the sense of safety

Team: Bin Jiang, Cecilia Mak (Co-PI, HK Government)

Project Funder: No funding

Abstract: The back alley is a common but often neglected urban space in high-density cities. Citizens, especially females, try to avoid back alleys because of the problem of safety. Citizens often perceive the back alleys as gray, unsanitary, chaotic, crime-infested places. In fact, many alleys have the potential to be benign or even valuable spaces that can benefit citizens in multiple ways. In this study, we examined people’s safety perceptions of existing alley conditions in Hong Kong city.

We used a photo-questionnaire survey to investigate how design interventions to revitalize alleys impact people’s safety perceptions. We selected five back alleys in Hong Kong and took panoramic photos of existing conditions. Next, we produced photo simulations for each of the alleys by using Adobe Photoshop 6.0, highlighting specific landscape or urban function interventions that could revitalize the five alley scenes. 218 participants participated in a photo questionnaire to rate the safety of scenes displaying the existing alley conditions and alley interventions.

Our results show that the Cleaning intervention yielded the lowest and very limited effect. The Landscape Only interventions yielded moderate but still insufficient effect. We found that green landscapes with a geometrical style promoted a greater sense of safety than green landscapes with a naturalistic style. Urban Function & Landscape interventions, including the presence of exercise facilities, shops, cafés or pocket parks, can promote the greatest and remarkable effect on the sense of safety. The gender difference is another important finding. We found that females reported a lower sense of safety of the existing scene and scenes after the Landscape Only Interventions (including “vertical only greening—natural style,” “vertical only greening—geometric style,” “vertical and ground greening—natural style,” and “vertical and ground greening—geometric style.”) than males. However, when Urban Function & Landscape Interventions were included (e.g. “Green Gym”, “Green Shops”, “Naturalistic Green Park” and so on), there was no gender difference in safety perception. Females reported a significant higher sense of safety of the alley with the presence of café.

These findings provide clear evidence for city managers and environmental design professionals to develop regulations or design guidelines aiming to transform the back alley in high-density cities to enhance the sense of safety and mitigate gender disparity. (Kuo, Bacaicoa, & Sullivan, 1998; Seymour, Wolch, Reynolds, & Bradbury, 2010; Wolch et al., 2010).

Quotation: Invited presentation on International Criminology Conference 2015, Guangzhou, China; Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture 2016 Annual Conference, Utah, USA

Mapping of relationship

Creating Right Greenway in the High-Density Inner City to Promote Residents’ Mental Health and Wellbeing: Evidence from a Mega-city in China

Name: Bin Jiang

Title: Creating Right Greenway in the High-Density Inner City to Promote Residents’ Mental Health and Wellbeing: Evidence from a Mega-city in China

Team: Bin Jiang, Weiting Shan (Co-PI, Northeast University, China)

Project Funder: Faculty of Architecture seed fund

Abstract: Greenway in the high-density inner city is an emerging prototype of public space. Inner-city residents are more likely to reap mental health benefits from nearby landscapes they like and perceive to be safe, restorative, and relaxing—places enabling them to escape the stresses of busy, compact, high-stress urban life (Kuo, Bacaicoa, & Sullivan, 1998; Kuo & Sullivan, 2001; Kweon, Sullivan, & Wiley, 1998; Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2002). Without a clear understanding of user perceptions, designers lack scientific evidence to create greenways that promote residents’ mental health and well-being. To help fill this knowledge gap, researchers conducted a photo-questionnaire regarding greenways in the central urban districts of ShenZhen, a highly dense mega-city in China.

We asked two main research questions: To what extent, what citizens’ mental responses to the scenes of urban greenways can predict their place preference? To what extent, what environmental characteristics of urban greenways can predict those mental responses? Three experts selected 60 out of 200 photos that can adequately represent five main greenways in two main residential districts in ShenZhen. 1053 of 1212 recruited residents completed the survey. Each participant answered 24 different questions covering measures of environmental attributes, mental responses, and place preference (7-point Likert Scale questions). Each question was for one randomly assigned photo out of all 60 photos.

We found the place preference is positively associated with four mental responses: Being Away from Urban Environment, Sense of Legibility, Relaxation, and Being Away from Daily Life. Significant predictive environmental characteristics for Being Away from Urban Environment include Coherence of landscape elements (+), Naturalness (+), Tree canopy coverage (+). Significant predictive characteristics for Sense of Legibility include: View Blocking (-), Overall environment quality (+), and Naturalness (-); Significant predictive characteristics for Relaxation include: Coherence of Landscape Elements (+), Tree canopy coverage (+), View Blocking (-), Naturalness (-); Significant predictive characteristics for Being Away from the daily life include: Naturalness (+), Complexity of paving patterns (-), and Overall environment quality (+). These findings provide clear evidence to direct greenway design in the high-density urban environment. To promote inner-city residents’ mental health and wellbeing, designers should focus on specific perceptional pathways and environmental attributes.

Note: “+” means positive association and “ – “ means negative association (p< .05). Naturalness indicates to what extent a landscape grows spontaneously, without a clear hint of artificial management or pruning (Zheng, Zhang, & Chen, 2011). View Blocking indicates to what extent visitor’s vision in situ is obscured by plants or vertical features in the greenway.

Quotation: Invited presentation on Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture 2016 Annual Conference, Utah, USA

Conference Presentations and Speech

International conference presentations by lab members

  • Jiang, B. & Lan, L. (2021). Significance of Oppressiveness: A Pathways Model to Interpret Impacts of Streetscapes on Mental Stress in the High-Density City. In 2021 Annual Conference of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Online, March 17–20, 2021.
  • Jiang, B., Shen, K., Sullivan, W.C., Yang, Y., Liu, X., & Lu, Y. (2021). Significant Impacts of Built Environment on Public Housing Residents’ Suicide Rates: A 13-year Natural Experiment. Accepted by 2021 Annual Conference of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Online, March 17–20, 2021.
  • Luo, L., Yu, P., & Jiang, B. (2021) Blue Matters: Using EEG Technology to Measure Impacts of Various Bluescapes on Human’s Psycho-physiological restoration. Accepted by 2021 Annual Conference of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Online, March 17–20, 2021.
  • Yu, P., & Luo, L. (2021). A national survey of LGBTQ students’ experience and behavior in queer spaces of Chinese colleges and universities. In 2021 Annual Conference of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Online, March 17–20, 2021.
  • Yang, Y., Dong, Y., Liu, X., & Jiang, B. (2021). Investigate the Impacts of Landscape Characteristics on the disparity of Children and the Elderly’ Presence and Behavior in Urban central Waterfront using the mixed method. In 2021 Annual Conference of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Online, March 17–20, 2021.
  • Luo, L., Liu, X., & Jiang, B. (2020). A new pathway model to interpret the impacts of the streetscape on citizens’ mental stress in the high-density city. In 14th International Association for China Planning (IACP) Virtual Conference. Shenzhen, China, 2020.
  • Jiang, B. (2019) “Influences of new technologies on urban environmental planning and design.” In The 15th International Conference on Green and Energy-efficient & New Technologies and Products Expo. Shenzhen, China.
  • Jiang, B., Chen, J. L., He, J. B., & Webster, C. (2019). “A trade-off effect: Comparing impacts of a variety of freeway landscapes on drivers’ driving performance and self-reported mental status.” In 2019 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Sacramento, California, USA.
  • Jiang, B. & Wang, H.Q. (2019). “Identifying environmental factors that have significant impacts on sweatshop workers’ stress and anxiety status: A photo-narrative study. “ In 2019 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Sacramento, California, USA.
  • Su, S. S. & Jiang, B. (2018). Living on the edge – Creating health public space for foreign domestic helpers. In 2018 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
  • Su, S. S. & Jiang, B. (2018). 10′, 35′, and 90′ – Multi-functional Landscape in the Compact Manufacturing Plant. In 2018 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
  • Jiang, B., Bao, F. Y., Wang, H.Q., Pryor, M., Webster, C.J. (2017). Creating mentally restorative landscape for sweatshop workers: A participatory research. In 2017 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Beijing, China.
  • Jiang, B., Wang, H.Q., Pryor, M., Bao, F. Y., Sullivan, W.C., Webster, C.J. (2017). Complexity and mismatch: comparing perception of acoustic and visual environments in the high-density city. In 2017 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Beijing, China.
  • Jiang, B. & Tang, D. (2017). “Public Health and the illegal E-waste industry in China—alternative visions from urban planning and landscape design.” In 2017 Annual Conference of the American Association of Geographers (AAG). Boston, USA.
  • Jiang, B., Ji, W.Q., Pryor, M. R., Zhang, T., & Sullivan, W. C. (2016). “Urban soundscapes: The interactive effect of auditory and visual stimulations on mood.” In 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  • Jiang, B., & Mak. N. Z. (2016). “Revitalizing alleys in high-density cities: How urban and landscape design interventions impact the sense of safety.” In 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  • Schmillen, R., Jiang, B., & Sullivan. W. C. (2016). “Impact of exposure to green spaces and laptop use on students’ cognitive functioning.” In 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  • W. T. & Jiang, B. (2016). “Health and wellbeing: Evidence from a Mega-city in China.” In 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  • Suppakittpaisarn, P., Jiang, B., & Sullivan. W. C. (2016). “How much vegetation density in green infrastructure do people prefer?” In 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  • Suppakittpaisarn, P., Jiang, B., & Sullivan. W. C. (2016). “Scripting in landscape assessment: A vegetation density case study.” In 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  • Jiang, B., & Mak. N. Z. (2016). “Measuring impacts of urban design solutions on citizens’ sense of safety. Revitalizing back alleys in Hong Kong.” The international Conference on Crime Geography. Guangzhou, China.
  • Conference presentation with Cecilia Mak Nga Sze on “Measuring impacts of urban design solutions on citizens’ sense of safety: Revitalizing back alleys in Hong Kongat the International Conference on Crime Geography, Guangzhou, in July 2015
  • Pryor, M. and Chen, Y.X.  Landfill after use: planning for acceptance. Accepted for publication in proceedings of 15th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium.  International Waste Working Group, S. Margherita di Pula, Sardinia. Italy. October 2015

Conference Organisation by Dr Bin Jiang

  • Co-chair, Healthy Cities and Landscapes Session. Annual conference Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU). 2018.
  • Co-organiser, Urban landscape for people. International Landscape Forum. The University of Hong Kong. 2018.
  • Co-chair of the 2017 CELA Annual Conference (Research and Methods track), editorship of conference papers and proceedings, Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA in USA). 2017.
  • Co-organiser of an academic workshop: Healthy Landscape Workshop. 2017 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Cooperated with Sullivan W.C., Chang C.Y., and Li D.Y. 2017.
  • Co-organiser of an academic workshop: Healthy Landscapes & Human Health. 2016 Annual Conference of Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA, USA). Salt Lake City, Utah. USA. Cooperated with Sullivan W.C., Chang C.Y., and Li D.Y. 2016.

Keynote speeches by Dr Bin Jiang

  • Impacts of Urban Green Landscapes on Citizens’ Mental Health & Well-Being”. GPSC Global Online Series: How Built Environment Influences Physical and Mental Well-being of Urban Residents. World Bank Group. Oct 30. 2020.
  • “Impact of urban green spaces on citizens’ health and well-being: Recent research project of UEHH Lab, HKU.” The 21st leisure, recreation and tourism research symposium and international forum. Tunghai University. Taichung, Taiwan. Sep 29, 2019.
  • “The road to a healthy city: The benefits of urban nature for mental health.” The symposium on theories and application of natural landscape and health. National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Sep 28, 2019.
  • “How to promote living quality through low-cost environmental interventions in the urban village.” China Design Forum, National Exhibition and Convention Center. Shanghai, China. Sep 9, 2019.
  • “Urban nature as a free medicine.” Sustainability & Human Health Symposium: Sustainability and Human Health Beyond Boundaries. Chiang Mai University. Chiang Mai, Thailand. Jun 15, 2019.
  • “Aged with young heart: Designing healthy landscapes with a mind of elders’ physical and psychological characteristics.” The First Sino-British Ageing Innovation International Forum. The University of Chong Qing, Chongqing, China. 2018.
  • “Positive impact of urban nature on mental health.” International Summit Forum of Therapy Landscape and Health Industry. Social Work Association of China, Changzhou, China. 2017.
  • “Healthy city, healthy landscape: Promoting stress recovery through changing urban environment.” 2016 Annual International Forum of Therapeutic Horticulture. Hong Kong Association of Therapeutic Horticulture. Guangzhou, China. 2016.
  • “Healthy city, healthy landscape: New perspective and methods on urbanization in China.” Asian Design Award 2015 Annual Conference by Asia Architecture and Urbanism Alliance (AAUA). Tongji University, Shanghai, China. 2015.
  • “Influence of urban green infrastructure on public health” in the Faculty of Architecture, Hunan University, Changsha, Oct. 2015