GALLERY INDEX

Post-human ecologies: Analysing and interpreting effects of man made landscape

MLA Thesis Section (2018-19)

Related Staff : Susanne Trumpf

Students: CHAN Ka Ying May; CHAN Tsz Wa Koni; IP Ka Ho Henry; SIN Wai Yin Sammy

The heatwave in summer 2018 unveiled a large amount of buried man-made structures such as roman settlements, ancient water systems, grave yards, and military structures all across Europe. The drought – a disaster for agriculture – is a blessing for aerial photo archeologists: the traces and crop marks shown in their images are caused by discontinuities in the (ground)water systems and disclose ancient structures with unprecedented clarity. The results of this summer’s discoveries will take years to be assessed and interpreted by archeologists; meanwhile, what is the role of landscape architects in this scenario? How do extreme temperature changes affect the way we look at landscape and how can those ‘images from above’ of only a temporally visible phenomenon inspire to rethink organisational, ecological and social interconnections of approaching landscape design? In the past century, documentation through surveys, photography, and maps has been as evident as never before. Yet, we are far away from fully grasping the impact of interventions produced by humanity. The proposed concept of the anthropocene gives only an abstract idea on how human presence will affect environment, nature and geology. However, current environmental issues – for example dramatic changes in microclimate or poor adaptation of planting species – caused by ongoing shifts of land use may give us a glimpse on future scenarios. This thesis stream will investigate the change in surface condition, ecology and ‘geological top layers’ through man made structures and climate change. It will raise the challenge for landscape architects on how to deal with this sometimes unknown, invisible or only temporally visible heritage and how to respond to the challenges of enabling functioning ecological systems within this context. Potential topics can refer to: Ecological restoration strategies on former (ore)mines (in West Germany); Agriculture on roman settlements: land-use adaptations in history and future; and Learning from ancient qanat systems: future irrigation for desert cities.

Cultural Landscape in Hong Kong: Conservation Strategies for Abandoned Mining Tunnels. By CHAN Tsz Wa Koni.Cultural Landscape in Hong Kong: Conservation Strategies for Abandoned Mining Tunnels. By CHAN Tsz Wa Koni.Cultural Landscape in Hong Kong: Conservation Strategies for Abandoned Mining Tunnels. By CHAN Tsz Wa Koni.Cultural Landscape in Hong Kong: Conservation Strategies for Abandoned Mining Tunnels. By CHAN Tsz Wa Koni.Cultural Landscape in Hong Kong: Conservation Strategies for Abandoned Mining Tunnels. By CHAN Tsz Wa Koni.Cultural Landscape in Hong Kong: Conservation Strategies for Abandoned Mining Tunnels. By CHAN Tsz Wa Koni.
UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE