GALLERY INDEX

Studio Yangon 2017: Dala, Landscape Strategies in a Tropical Urban Environment

Landscape Design Studio II (2016-17)

Related Staff : Michael Kokora, Scott Melbourne, Vincci MAK


ARCH7132 STUDIO YANGON 2017: DALA This course introduces students to the fundamental practices of landscape planning and site design in a dynamic urban context. Studio Yangon 2017 was the fourth iteration of the Landscape Division’s multi-year design and research undertaking focusing on Yangon, the commercial capital and largest city in Myanmar (Burma). This year, the studio looked outside the urban core to Dala Township located across Yangon River. Through a series of design and research exercises, the studio aimed to identify and enhance the potential for landscape systems to play an active role in the strategic development of this area and of the city as a whole. In this course, the second of three studios within the MLA design curriculum, students continued to develop an iterative working process that responds to feedback and criticism. Students expanded their capacity to work simultaneously in a range of scales and to consider landscape beyond form, as processes and performance. Through discussions and precedent analysis, the studio engages in a critical dialogue with contemporary practices of landscape architecture and planning, examining their claims through the lens of a unique urban situation. Ultimately, students were challenged to develop an appreciation for the complex economic, ecological, and social factors that underlie urban environments, and to translate ideas into space, organization, and strategy.

Enlarge Photo: Existing landscape conditions within Yangon's Dala Township / Scott Melbourne
Enlarge Photo: Existing landscape conditions within Yangon's Dala Township / Scott MelbourneEnlarge Photo: Existing landscape conditions within Yangon's Dala Township / Scott MelbourneEnlarge Photo: Studio Yangon 2017: Dala, Landscape Strategies in a Tropical Urban Environment 4
UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE