GALLERY INDEX

Projective Design Manual – For Japan’s Future Cities

Tom Verebes Studio

Related Staff : Tom Verebes

Students: Chan Yat Ning Chester; Chu Lok Hin Rodney; Doo Ka Wai Jason; Ho Lai Ki Nikki; Kwong Ka Wai Felis; Peter Colin Lampard; Leung Wai Hung Raymond; Shen Jiemei Rosabel; Tang Wai Kwong Danny; Yuen Ka Yan Ada; Yu Man Fung Jonathan

The Tohuku earthquake and tsunami of 2011 had devastated vast urban territories, and this studio sought to articulate visionary concepts through process-oriented methodologies for the future of coastal urbanization in Japan. As the conceptual basis of the Projective Design Manual, the studio targeted the paradox of “Planning” for indeterminable events within an increasingly uncertain world.

As a “manual”, the output of this studio aimed to negotiate the parallel contingencies of everyday life with the prerogatives of disaster prevention. Although other areas of Japan suffered greater devastation in 2011, Sendai Airport, the site for this studio, was also badly damaged in the tsunami, remaining closed for two months. Given the vital status of Sendai Airport as a hub for various road, rail and air infrastructures and cargo shipping, situated in a vulnerable context, there is an evident necessity to develop secure infrastructures. In response, this studio investigated how preventive emergency systems can also be catalysts to privilege new kinds of everyday space. Far from a cry to repair and return coastal Japan to its pre-Tohuku earthquake state, this studio aimed to discover new associations of architectural space, landscapes and infrastructures of various kinds, to sustain, as well as to innovate Japan’s costal urbanism.

Through an associative logic of multiple, correlated systems, student teams generated specific patterns of heterogeneous and differentiated spatial behaviours, on a range of scales of design. Focusing on the relation of adaptive, bottom up modes of design development, to top down planning procedures, design proposals interrogated the limits of architectural form, here understood less as permanent, fixed, material compositions than as a mobile, dynamic forces and interactions.

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UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE