GALLERY INDEX

Architecture & Urban Design III (ARCH 5001) – Hong Kong Tower Revolution

Related Staff : Winy Maas

Supervisor: Winy Maas (MVRDV/ The Why Factory, TU Delft)
Studio Tutor: Tihamér Salij (The Why Factory, TU Delft)
Scripting Tutors: Sander Mulders with Arend van Waart
Students: Au Wing Yi, Chak Tsz Kin, Chan Chung Man, Chan Ian Yin Yan, Chan Pui Yin, Chau Shek Lun, Cheng Ching, Ip Kai Hong, Liu Kemeng, Mok Wang Chee, Tang Ho Yin, Kong Ho Ching, Kwok Ka Ching, Lau Xin Yee, Lee Kin Wai, Li Mei Yu, Lung Man Ching, Ma Ching Yi, Suen Wing Yin, Sze Ivy, Sze Ying Ying, Yeung Cho Yui, Yeung Ho Man

Hong Kong’s current housing tower design is heavily governed by the development potentials / controls under the Hong Kong Planning Ordinance and the Building Ordinance. In contrast with the competition with other global cities, the repetitive design seem to lack size variation, outdoor spaces, diversity, greenness, ecology as well as a lack of architectural excitement.

How can Hong Kong’s housing escape its unrelenting uniformity and the denial of diversity?

How to escape from the current stringent planning and building regulations?

How to create more qualities? And what qualities should that be?

This studio studied the organization of apartments and looked into the different types of rooms and their functions. It explored various activities such as cooking, dining, bathing, sleeping, storing, relaxing and made proposals for improvement of these activities. Each improvement required a specific spatial quality and led to new apartment typologies. Some qualities included higher ceilings, more window openings, different room shapes, more outdoor spaces or more privacy. Other qualities asked for different connections, better natural cooling, more sustainable measures or better access and views to the outdoor.

This studio opened the discussion for a more diverse housing development and proposed various motives for both horizontal and vertical mixing that led to housing towers with a higher amount of porosity (open space).

It showcased 30 alternative residential tower typology designs that can be understood as a first step to add more diversity to the Hong Kong housing market. The towers were measured against value indicators such as view, direct sunlight, indirect light, access to outdoor space, and amount of useable space.

The studio results were exhibited at the 2013 Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/ Architecture (UABB) in Hong Kong.

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UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE