UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE

Yishiqin LI

Yishiqin LI
Date:
20-Feb-2019
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Venue:
Room 829, 8/F, Knowles Building, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road Hong Kong
Title:
Redeveloping collectively-owned land in urban China: transitional institutions, negotiation process and planning effectiveness
Speaker(s):
Miss Yishiqin LI
PhD Student
Department of Urban Planning and Design
The University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

Rapid urbanization and extensive economic transition have led to debates on land redevelopment and spatial transformation in urban china, particularly in the old inner-city areas where most of the land is collectively owned, due to deteriorating built environment and poor living conditions. Redevelopment of collectively owned land is a complex process involving multiple stakeholders that have effective rights to exclude each other from efficient utilization of land (Zhu, 2018; Buchanan & Yoon, 2000; Heller, 1998). This is known as the tragedy of the anticommons, or practically known as “hold-out” problems. As a response to the dilemma, some Chinese cities initiated institutional changes in planning and redevelopment of collectively owned land in urban areas to meet the demand of infrastructure upgrading and seek opportunities for land value capture.  In this context, debates emerged as whether government-led land readjustment or market-driven approach of land assembly would be more effective and efficient in achieving planning objectives. By investigating empirical cases in Shenzhen, where both approaches were applied, this research aims to fill the research gaps by answering the main question of how different institutional arrangements affect the negotiation process among urban government, developers and village collectives, resulting in different levels of efficiency and effectiveness in restructuring physical environment of the city.

About the Speaker:

Miss. Li Yishiqin is a second-year PhD student in the Department of Urban Planning and Design at the University of Hong Kong. She holds a master’s degree in Urbanism from Delft University of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning from Chongqing University. Her research interests include urban redevelopment, land related institutions in urban China.

~~ ALL INTERESTED ARE WELCOME ~~

 

 

Enquiries: 3917 2721
CENTRE OF URBAN STUDIES AND URBAN PLANNING
THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

SEARCH